CS Masthead

Commissioners Approve Purchase Of Sheriff’s Car

The Roosevelt County Commissioners approved the purchase of a 2015 Dodge Charger for the sheriff’s office from Northern Prairie Auto Sales for $25,448 Tuesday, Feb. 24.
The commission passed a resolution allowing the expenditure of grant funds by the sheriff’s office for a vehicle purchase and employee overtime. The grant is for $50,852.
The commissioners also authorized the purchase of a chest freezer for the sheriff’s office from Gysler’s Furniture and Appliance.
The commission also approved an agreement with Great Northern Development Corp. to administer a grant to fund an architect for a senior center in Poplar.
The commissioners authorized the county to hire Montana Grafix of Chinook to design a new website for the county. The county will own the domain.
The commission appointed Lindsey McNabb and John Plestina to the county’s mosquito board.

Federal Funding Losses To Counties Little Impact On Roosevelt County

While many of Montana counties have lost a total of about $20 million in the bipartisan spending bill that avoided another government shutdown, the impact to Roosevelt County is between $600 and $800.
Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., co-authored bipartisan legislation that would restore Secure Rural Schools program and Payment In Lieu of Taxes funding to 2011 levels and extend both programs for three years.
Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont., supports the legislation.
PILT benefits most counties in Montana with funding for federal lands that local governments cannot tax.
The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a $1 trillion spending bill to keep the government operating through September. That legislation excludes the $330 million Secure Rural Schools program.
The lions share of the PILT funding in Montana benefits counties in the western part of the state, Roosevelt County Commissioner Gary Macdonald said.
“We have very little federal land,” he said.
PILT benefits counties in several western states with public lands managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service.
Valley County receives considerably more in PILT funding than Roosevelt County because of a presence of BLM lands.
Another issue is that there is no authorization for PILT funding for Indian reservation lands, which comprise most of Roosevelt County.
“I wish it [reservation lands] did. We have periodically tried to get it to count [for PILT],” Macdonald said.
“The National Association of Counties has looked at it. I don’t know if it will ever hit Congress,” he said.

Keystone XL Pipeline Bill Vetoed

President Barack Obama vetoed the construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline Tuesday, Feb. 24.
It was the third time he used his veto power in the more than six years of his presidency.
Obama bucked the Republican majority in Congress in taking the action he did preventing construction of the pipeline that has become a flashpoint in the U.S. debate about environmental policy and climate change.
House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, called the veto a national embarrassment and was reported as saying the Republicans were not giving up the fight for the Keystone XL oil pipeline.
The move sends the politically charged issue back to Congress, where Republicans haven’t shown they can muster the two-thirds majority in both chambers needed to override Obama’s veto. North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven, the bill’s chief GOP sponsor, was reported as saying the Republicans are about four votes short in the Senate and need about 11 more in the House.
The $8 billion Keystone XL pipeline project was proposed more than six years ago and has awaited required federal permitting because it would cross an international boundary. The pipeline would connect Canada’s tar sands with refineries on the Texas Gulf Coast that specialize in processing heavy crude oil.
Proponents of the project say it would create jobs, spur growth and increase America’s independence from Mideast energy sources.

Best Beginnings Council Announces New Program for Families with Young Children

The Fort Peck Tribes and Roosevelt County Best Beginnings Council is pleased to announce the availability of a new program for families with young children called Parents as Teachers.
Parents as Teachers is an evidence-based home visiting model that provides family support including resource and referral, parental education, and parent support groups from pregnancy until the child is three years of age. (If a family is already being served and the need is there, services can continue to age five.)
Raising children is one of the toughest and most fulfilling jobs in the world — and the one for which parents sometimes feel the least prepared.  Parents as Teachers helps parents be their baby’s first, best teacher so infants in our community will grow up happy, healthy, and ready for success.  There are four certified parent educators available to visit families at their home or other comfortable location. The service is free and available throughout Roosevelt County and the Fort Peck Reservation.
Parent educators help families understand and enjoy the stages their baby is going through. They meet with parents regularly to listen to concerns, share ideas and information, and coordinate support to help young children succeed. They stand by parents to help them become more confident and successful.
The program also provides opportunities for families to have fun and make friends with other parents at family get-togethers. These family connections will also be available at no charge to participating families.
To find out how to sign up, or to get more information, call 768-3052 in Poplar or 653-6223 in Wolf Point.
The Best Beginnings Community Council brings together a group of individuals interested and committed to the development of a comprehensive, coordinated early childhood system for children from prenatal to the age of five and their families. One of the top priorities for the group is providing resources for effective parenting.

Firefighting For Your Neighbors Free Training Offered Thursday

The Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation will conduct two courses for wild-land firefighting for local farmers and ranchers.
It will provide insight on firefighting safety, strategies, tactics and working together with firefighters.  
The course will be held in Culbertson, Thursday, Feb. 26, and Wolf Point, Friday, Feb. 27. Both courses will begin at 6 p.m. at local fire stations.  
The training will be free and a meal will be provided.  
Sign-up as soon as possible by contacting Wolf Point Fire Chief Shawn Eggar at 939-5769, Culbertson Fire Chief Alan Aspenlieder at 790-0888 or Roosevelt County Fire Warden Steve Harada at 650-2222.


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